Applications

Atmospheric LiDAR

Atmospheric LiDAR

Atmospheric LiDAR is an advanced remote sensing technology that employs laser beams to analyze the Earth's atmosphere. By measuring the backscattered light from atmospheric particles, it provides detailed information on vertical profiles, aiding meteorology, climate research, and air quality monitoring. Atmospheric LiDAR plays a pivotal role in understanding complex atmospheric processes and contributes essential data for climate models and environmental assessments.

Flash LiDAR

Flash LiDAR

Flash LiDAR is an advanced remote sensing technology that utilizes laser pulses in a rapid, sweeping fashion to create high-resolution 3D maps of the surroundings. Unlike traditional Lidar systems that rely on scanning mechanisms, Flash Lidar captures the entire scene simultaneously, providing real-time and comprehensive spatial information. This innovative approach enhances the speed and efficiency of mapping, making Flash Lidar well-suited for applications in autonomous vehicles, robotics, and environmental monitoring.

Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR)

Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR)

LiDAR (stands for Light Detection and Ranging) is a remote measurement technique, that incorporates laser pulses (used in most types of LiDAR) or laser frequency modulation for distance estimation and scanning of environment. The technology of LiDAR is built on basic principles of physics – the range measurement is calculated by taking into account the time it took for the laser pulse to reflect off of a surface and echo back to a detector or a sensor.

Stationary Terrestrial LiDAR

Stationary Terrestrial LiDAR

Stationary Terrestrial LiDAR, also known as Static Terrestrial LiDAR, is a technology used for non-contact 3D mapping and monitoring of stationary objects and environments. Unlike traditional mobile LiDAR systems mounted on vehicles, stationary LiDAR setups are fixed in a specific location. These systems utilize laser beams emitted from a stationary unit to measure distances and create detailed 3D point clouds of the surrounding area.

Confocal Microscopy

Confocal Microscopy

Confocal microscopy is a powerful imaging technique used in biological and materials science research. By employing point illumination and a spatial pinhole, confocal microscopy eliminates out-of-focus light, resulting in sharper, high-resolution images. This method enables three-dimensional imaging of specimens with exceptional optical sectioning, making it valuable for studying biological structures and dynamic processes at the cellular and subcellular levels.

Super-resolution Microscopy

Super-resolution Microscopy

Traditional microscopy methods have served researchers for decades. Most conventional microscopes can image at resolutions between 1µm and 250nm which is sufficient to observe cellular dynamics and many internal structures. However, the necessity to discern finer details and develop new molecular based therapeutics has lead to the field of Super-Resolution Microscopy.

Flow Cytometry

Flow Cytometry

Flow cytometry is a sophisticated analytical technique widely used in biomedical research and clinical diagnostics. It allows for the simultaneous analysis of multiple physical and chemical characteristics of cells or particles as they flow through a laser beam. By utilizing fluorescence and light-scattering principles, flow cytometry provides valuable insights into cell populations, allowing researchers to study cell morphology, identify cell types, and assess various cellular functions with high-throughput precision.

Fluorescence Spectroscopy

Fluorescence Spectroscopy

Fluorescence spectroscopy, with its origins in the early 20th century, has evolved into a sophisticated tool widely used in analytical chemistry, molecular biology, and pharmacology. The prevalence of this tool and its diverse applications can be equally attributed to developments in optics and laser technology as much as breakthroughs in the natural sciences.

Photoacoustic imaging

Photoacoustic imaging

Photoacoustic imaging is a process where powerful laser pulses interact with material by exciting acoustic waves. Similarly, as in ultrasound imaging, the propagating acoustic waves are analyzed by piezo-based detectors (pick-ups), and the complete 3D image is formed by raster scanning or other techniques, such as laser-based holography or interferometry.

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